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Vol 26 No 1 2018

Free downloadThe Institutional Turn: Labour’s new political economy

Editorial // Martin O’Neill, Joe Guinan

In a preview of our summer issue, Joe Guinan and Martin O’Neill argue that the Labour leadership is putting together the elements of a new twenty-first century socialist political economy with a direct focus on ownership, control, and participation.

Free downloadWork, autonomy and community

Editorial // James Stafford, Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite

Beyond the reversal of the damage caused by state austerity and corporate excess, beyond even the construction of new institutions to guarantee economic justice and ecological stability, what kinds of emancipation, what forms of life, should the left promote in the twenty-first century?

Free downloadImproving the quality of work

Essay // Tom Watson MP

The automation revolution demands an active state: one that promotes investment in new technologies while securing good jobs for all workers.

Free downloadTechnology, capitalism and the future of the left

Feature // Nick Srnicek, Lise Butler

Nick Srnicek in conversation with Lise Butler about technology, capitalism, Universal Basic Income (UBI), the potential of automation and the challenge for the left in limiting corporate power over new technologies.

Speenhamland, automation and basic income: a response

Response // Malcolm Torry

In our last issue, Frederick Pitts, Lorena Lombardozzi and Neil Warner criticised the idea of a Basic Income; Malcolm Torry argues that far from depressing wages it would have emancipatory effects on workers.

The disintegrated firm

Review // Dan Chandler

Since the 1980s, vertically integrated firms have increasingly given way to more varied and fissured workplaces, contributing to the growth of poorly paid and precarious work, and to deteriorating working conditions. David Weil’s book analyses what can be done.

Young and old meritocracy: from radical critique to neoliberal tool

Essay // Jo Littler

Since the 1970s a neoliberal form of meritocracy has become the basic common sense of British society. But it needs challenging, for all this meritocratic system does is justify hierarchies and vast inequalities, and marketise more and more of life. A socialist alternative should value diversity and democracy, and, above all, tackle economic inequality.

Free downloadNarrating the economy

Essay // Christine Berry

What is the story of the economy in Britain? Who gets to shape public opinion about what it’s for, how it’s broken and how it can be fixed? And how can progressive forces tell a new story to help accelerate the shift to a new economic system?

Feminism and the Labour left: a perfect political union?

Feature // Charlotte Proudman

Socialist and feminist politics have sometimes had a difficult relationship in the past, but an intersectional approach can move past these issues. Charlotte Proudman looks at the importance of culture and policy, and sets out four ways feminist policies should feature in Labour’s programme for 2018 and beyond.

Free downloadThe lost world of Peter Lee

Feature // John Tomaney

There is a growing recognition that decentralisation and localism should play a key role in a future Labour manifesto. Where should Labour look for lessons about effective localism? The party’s own past provides valuable lessons about how to forge a progressive localism.

Free downloadPeter Lee and localism today

Response // Rachel Reeves

To follow the example of Peter Lee today, Labour needs to work to localise power, build an industrial strategy based on the needs of the everyday economy and democratise the way our economy works.

Alternatives to State Socialism

Essay // Alastair J Reid

The labour movement’s vibrant, too-often forgotten tradition of local, participatory and decentralised forms of politics, provides a vital tradition for Labour to draw on, showing how localist perspectives might invigorate the party’s emerging critique of contemporary capitalism.

Renewal